material

Polypropylene (PP)
also known as polypropene, is a thermoplastic polymer used in a wide variety of applications including packaging, textiles, stationery, plastic parts and reusable containers of various types, laboratory equipment, loudspeakers, automotive components. An addition polymer made from the monomer propylene, it is rugged and unusually resistant to many chemical solvents and glues, bases and acids.In 2007, the global market for polypropylene had a volume of 45.1 million tons.

The melting of polypropylene occurs as a range, so a melting point is determined by finding the highest temperature of a differential scanning calorimetry chart. Perfectly isotactic PP has a melting point of 171 °C. Commercial isotactic PP has a melting point that ranges from 160 to 166 °C, depending on atactic material and crystallinity. Syndiotactic PP with a crystallinity of 30% has a melting point of 130 °C. Polypropylene with higher MFR will fill the plastic mold more easily during the injection or blow-molding production process. As the melt flow increases, however, some physical properties, like impact strength, will decrease.The most common shaping technique is injection molding, which is used for parts such as cups, cutlery, vials, caps, containers, housewares, and automotive parts such as batteries. The related techniques of blow molding and injection-stretch blow molding are also used, which involve both extrusion and molding.
Preparation is important and it is often helpful to roughen the surface with a file, emery paper or other abrasive material to provide better anchorage for the glue. Also it is recommended to clean with mineral spirits or similar alcohol prior to gluing to remove any oils or other contamination.  
Some experimentation may be required.